Emily Talen

Associate Professor of Urban and Regional Planning

University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign


ESRG Interests: collaborative methodologies, diversity in urbanism

http://www.urban.uiuc.edu/faculty/talen/

http://www.urban.uiuc.edu/research/talen.html

WHITE PAPER: Planning for Social Diversity

[An outline of a strategy to manage stability in socially diverse neighborhoods, in the presence of pressures to stratify and segregate]

Planners often define urban planning as being about change: encouraging change that is desired and discouraging change that is not. In the case of planning for social diversity, however, it might be more apt to define urban planning as being about stability: how to keep a place diverse and prevent it from being overrun by one particular social group or one particular land use. In such cases, the goal of urban planning may be to encourage change that supports a stable heterogeneity – the continued presence of social diversity – while discouraging change that undermines it....[1]


[1] Neighborhood social diversity is defined here as the mixing of people of different income levels, ages, races, ethnicities, and household types in one relatively small area, perhaps 160 acres (1/2 mile square).